Marygrove Library Book Discussion Group is Gearing Up For Its Next Discussion

bee-a-readers

Who:

Students, Faculty, Staff, Alumni, and Guests

What:

Marygrove Library is hosting their second book discussion group. During the dates of December 2, 2014 through January 31st, 2015, students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests are invited to review proposed book titles and submit their first and second book choices. Each person who submits their choice, as well as their name and email address via the Survey Monkey link provided will be entered to win a copy of the chosen book. A short synopsis of each book will be provided to introduce participants to titles they may not be familiar with. Once the most popular title has been chosen, Marygrove Library will then invite the entire college community to read the chosen book independently. Multiple copies will be available for checkout at the Marygrove Library, as well as available through interlibrary loan.  There will be an informal book discussion group/gathering in which refreshments will be served.  Those who attend the informal book discussion group/gathering will be entered into a drawing to win one of the multiple copies Marygrove Library purchased for the book discussion group.

Where will I be able to checkout a copy of the chosen book?

Marygrove Library

When and where will the physical book discussion group be located?

Daniel Fisher Room of Marygrove Library TBA

When can I submit my survey with my book choices?

December 2, 2014 and January 31st, 2015

When will the winning title be announced?

February 1, 2015

When should I read the selected title?

February 1st, 2015 thru April 30th, 2015

Margrove Library Book Discussion Community Selections

The House Girl by Tara Conklin

Virginia, 1852. Seventeen-year-old Josephine Bell decides to run from the failing tobacco farm where she is a slave and nurse to her ailing mistress, the aspiring artist Lu Anne Bell. New York City, 2004. Lina Sparrow, an ambitious first-year associate in an elite law firm, is given a difficult, highly sensitive assignment that could make her career: she must find the “perfect plaintiff” to lead a historic class-action lawsuit worth trillions of dollars in reparations for descendants of American slaves.

It is through her father, the renowned artist Oscar Sparrow, that Lina discovers Josephine Bell and a controversy roiling the art world: are the iconic paintings long ascribed to Lu Anne Bell really the work of her house slave, Josephine? A descendant of Josephine’s would be the perfect face for the reparations lawsuit—if Lina can find one. While following the runaway girl’s faint trail through old letters and plantation records, Lina finds herself questioning her own family history and the secrets that her father has never revealed: How did Lina’s mother die? And why will he never speak about her?

Moving between antebellum Virginia and modern-day New York, this searing, suspenseful and heartbreaking tale of art and history, love and secrets, explores what it means to repair a wrong and asks whether truth is sometimes more important than justice.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

A groundbreaking work from a master, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is told with a rare understanding of all that makes us human, and shows the power of stories to reveal and shelter us from the darkness inside and out. It is a stirring, terrifying, and elegiac fable as delicate as a butterfly’s wing and as menacing as a knife in the dark.

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.

Kidd’s sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah’s eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership of ten year old Handful, who is to be her handmaid.We follow their remarkable journeys over the next thirty-five years, as both strive for a life of their own, dramatically shaping each other’s destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement and the uneasy ways of love.
As the stories build to a riveting climax, Handful will endure loss and sorrow, finding courage and a sense of self in the process. Sarah will experience crushed hopes, betrayal, unrequited love, and ostracism before leaving Charleston to find her place alongside her fearless younger sister, Angelina, as one of the early pioneers in the abolition and women’s rights movements.

Inspired by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke, Kidd goes beyond the record to flesh out the rich interior lives of all of her characters, both real and invented, including Handful’s cunning mother, Charlotte, who courts danger in her search for something better.

This exquisitely written novel is a triumph of storytelling that looks with unswerving eyes at a devastating wound in American history, through women whose struggles for liberation, empowerment, and expression will leave no reader unmoved.

We Are Water by Wally Lamb

In middle age, Annie Oh—wife, mother, and outsider artist—has shaken her family to its core. After twenty-seven years of marriage and three children, Annie has fallen in love with Viveca, the wealthy, cultured, confident Manhattan art dealer who orchestrated her professional success.

Annie and Viveca plan to wed in the Oh family’s hometown of Three Rivers, Connecticut, where gay marriage has recently been legalized. But the impending wedding provokes some very mixed reactions and opens a Pandora’s box of toxic secrets—dark and painful truths that have festered below the surface of the Ohs’ lives.

We Are Water is an intricate and layered portrait of marriage, family, and the inexorable need for understanding and connection, told in the alternating voices of the Ohs—nonconformist Annie; her ex-husband, Orion, a psychologist; Ariane, the do-gooder daughter, and her twin, Andrew, the rebellious only son; and free-spirited Marissa, the youngest Oh. Set in New England and New York during the first years of the Obama presidency, it is also a portrait of modern America, exploring issues of class, changing social mores, the legacy of racial violence, and the nature of creativity and art.

With humor and breathtaking compassion, Wally Lamb brilliantly captures the essence of human experience in vivid and unforgettable characters struggling to find hope and redemption in the aftermath of trauma and loss. We Are Water is vintage Wally Lamb—a compulsively readable, generous, and uplifting masterpiece that digs deep into the complexities of the human heart to explore the ways in which we search for love and meaning in our lives.

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline

The author of Bird in Hand and The Way Life Should Be delivers her most ambitious and powerful novel to date: a captivating story of two very different women who build an unexpected friendship: a 91-year-old woman with a hidden past as an orphan-train rider and the teenage girl whose own troubled adolescence leads her to seek answers to questions no one has ever thought to ask.

Nearly eighteen, Molly Ayer knows she has one last chance. Just months from “aging out” of the child welfare system, and close to being kicked out of her foster home, a community service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping her out of juvie and worse.

Vivian Daly has lived a quiet life on the coast of Maine. But in her attic, hidden in trunks, are vestiges of a turbulent past. As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly discovers that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.

The closer Molly grows to Vivian, the more she discovers parallels to her own life. A Penobscot Indian, she, too, is an outsider being raised by strangers, and she, too, has unanswered questions about the past. As her emotional barriers begin to crumble, Molly discovers that she has the power to help Vivian find answers to mysteries that have haunted her for her entire life – answers that will ultimately free them both.

Rich in detail and epic in scope, Orphan Train is a powerful novel of upheaval and resilience, of second chances, of unexpected friendship, and of the secrets we carry that keep us from finding out who we are.

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

Like many victims of the Great Recession, the web designer Clay Jannon finds himself out of a job. Then, thanks to serendipity (and his ability to climb a ladder like a monkey), Clay lands a new gig working the night shift at a mysterious San Francisco shop, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore. After just a few days on the job, Clay begins to wonder how the store stays in business. There are only a few customers. They come in repeatedly, but never seem to actually buy anything, instead “checking out” impossibly obscure volumes from strange corners of the store, all according to some elaborate, long-standing arrangement with the gnomic Mr. Penumbra. Clay soon ropes his friends into helping to figure out just what’s going on, revealing tantalizing secrets that can be traced back to the world’s first typeset books. In this captivating debut novel, Robin Sloan lures us to a hallowed bookstore that we’ll never want to leave, where a mysterious collection raises compelling questions about the nature of our love for books and the future of reading itself.

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The Marygrove Library Book Discussion Group Seeks Votes For Its Next Read

On December 2, 2014 at 4:30 pm Marygrove Library held their first Book Discussion Group in the Daniel Fisher Room to discuss Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides.  Four participants were in attendance and engaged in a lively conversation exploring such themes as gender, nature vs. nurture, genetics, family dynamics, as well the circular narrative of Cal.

If you would like to participate in selecting next book for next semester’s Book Discussion Group an online ballot with the proposed choices and brief synopsis is available @  https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/XGT7BXB.

If you would prefer to submit a hard copy of your book choice selection, Bee A Reader Ballot are available at the Circulation Desk.

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December 1-4 the Marygrove Library is open to students until midnight

At the request of the Marygrove College Student Government Association, the library will extend its hours of operation for the last week of Fall 2014 classes.

From Monday, December 1, through Thursday, December 4, parts of the library will remain open until midnight. The Fisher Room and the Research & Technology Commons (aka the reference room) will remain open; the stacks and the lower level will remain closed.

Students, we encourage you to give us feedback on these extended hours. Do you welcome this change? Is this helpful in terms of your study needs? Would you like to see extended hours next semester as well? You can call us at 313.927.1346 or email us at marygrovelibrary@gmail.com.

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The Library’s Book Discussion Group will meet Tuesday, December 2 at 4:30 PM in the Fisher Room

Marygrove Library's Book Discussion Group Invites you to discuss "Middlesex" by Jeffrey Eugenides, Tuesday, December 2nd from 4:30 PM to 5 PM in the Daniel Fisher Room of the Library.  Refreshments served.

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The Library will be closed November 27-30th for Thanksgiving

The Library will be closed November 27-30th for the Thanksgiving holiday.  We’ll see you back here on Monday!

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Presenting Marygrove Library’s Multicultural Book Group!

Who: Students, Faculty, Staff, Alumni, and Guests

What: Marygrove Library invites the entire college community to participate in their first multicultural book discussion group. Join us by independently reading Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides . Multiple copies will be available for checkout at the library Circulation Desk. In addition, there will be an online book discussion group, as well as an informal book discussion group/gathering in which refreshments will be served. Copies of the book will be raffled off at the in-person book discussion group. You must be present to win.

Where can I checkout a copy of the chosen book: Marygrove Library

Where can I participate in the online book discussion group? http://marygrovelibrarysonlinebookdiscussiongroup.wordpress.com/

When should I read the selected title?

October 23rd, 2014 thru November 30th, 2014

When can I participate in the online book discussion group?

October 23rd, 2014 thru November 30th, 2014

When can I participate in the in-person book discussion group?

Tuesday, December 2nd 4:30pm-6:00pm

Where will the physical book discussion group be located?

In the Daniel Fisher Room of Marygrove Library.

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Fisher Room

CLOSED

Library Fisher Room will not be available for group study this weekend (September 19th-21st). You will still be able to enter the library through the Fisher Room doors, but please walk through the space quietly.  Ask at the Circulation or Reference Desks for directions to alternative study areas. This is for this weekend only. We are sorry for the inconvenience and grateful for your cooperation and understanding.

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